5 from 9 votes

Parched Corn

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Parched corn is an interesting and addictive snack for those that not only love corn but love the crunch of nuts. If you have never had parched corn, it’s super easy!

It can be made anywhere there is a heat source from a skillet, to a flat-topped grill to open flamed fire, and takes just a few minutes to go from hard corn kernels to crunchy corn snack!

parched corn in oven
skillet full of delicious snackable and salty parched corn!

Parched corn recipes are also popular not only for the grab-and-go snack but that they are often used as survivalist food or hiking food that needs no refrigeration and lasts a long time.

Early pioneers carried parched corn in a small bag for quick nourishment that could even be ground into cornmeal for basic cakes and breakfast.

Parched Corn Ingredients

Parched corn is a great way to skip the pricy power bars (and plastic wrap) for a delicious trail snack. Combined with other nuts (and maybe a few M&Ms like a trail mix), this is easy to carry, and store, and it takes one of the old ways of doing things and makes it relevant and current to modern society.

All you need is a few simple ingredients to get started –

  • Oil Base – To parch corn, there needs to be an oil base. This can be a vegetable oil, butter, or lard. I personally use vegetable oil.
  • Dried Corn – Dried corn can be made from a piece of corn OR purchased already with kernels roomed.
    • Dry out a Corn Cob: An old-fashioned way to dry sweet corn or field corn is to leave out corn cobs and let dry completely. Kernels should remove super easily when fully dried. If not dry all the way, kernels can be harder to remove and need more time. Other ways are using a dehydrator or hanging cobs in a dry area of your home till completely dried out.
    • Purchase from the store: However, dried corn is easily purchased from the store. Typically corn is in the international section under Hispanic foods, as its often used as a Hispanic snack.
    • Purchase a bag of dried corn from amazon: You can also purchase dried corn from Amazon if not available locally.
  • Seasoning – Parched corn is fine with simple salt (as is most corn!) but seasonings like red pepper, ranch seasoning or even brown sugar and coconut sugar is a fun way to enjoy.

Are Corn Nuts and Parched Corn the Same Thing?

No! Parched corn is made from dried corn and oil, and corn nuts are typically hominy.

How long does Parched Corn Last?

Parched corn is easy to store at room temperature and, with just salt added, lasts at least three months.

How to make Parched Corn

Parched corn is so easy to make!

Take a large skillet or cast iron pan, and heat up approximately one tablespoon of oil, a small amount of butter or lard on the bottom of a pan medium heat. Carefully use a paper towel to make sure oil is spread evenly in the pan but is not in excess oil (you are not frying the corn).

Once the frying pan is heated and ready, cover the bottom of the skillet with dried corn, making sure not to overlap pieces. Depending on the size of the skillet will depend on how much-dried corn you can fit, but my skillet takes 1 1/2 cups.

Let dried corn heat till it begins to pop. When I make dried corn in the house, it can pop out of the skillet so I put a clear lid on the top of the corn and remove it every 30-45 seconds to stir.

Corn should puff up with air and slowly brown. Use a spatula to stir and brown evenly. Corn should not burn or pop into popcorn.

parched corn from dried corn

The whole process to medium brown color and an air puff takes about 5-7 minutes. Test out a kernel (carefully). Once the corn is soft but still crunchy, parched corn is completed.

The next step is to add additional spices (like more salt or seasonings from the pantry) or brown sugar and stir, remove from heat, and let cool.

Store parched corn in a dry cloth bag (for long-term storage without moisture) for an easy nutritious snack!

parched corn recipe
5 from 9 votes

Parched Corn {Easy}


Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Parched corn made from dried corn and salt, is an easy nutritious and old fashioned way of creating a "trail mix" that can be stored for months on end. With no special requirements, parched corn can be left at room temperature, used as a snack for instant energy, and is a favorite amongst survivalist's and canning/storage interests. Easy and quick to enjoy, the main ingredient is corn and can be left salty and savory or sweetened with brown sugar. Combine with other long term nuts for an addicting snack!

Ingredients
 

  • 1/2-1 tablespoon oil butter or lard – only enough to cover bottom of pan and may vary depending on size of skillet
  • 1-2 cups of dried corn
  • salt

Instructions

  • Taking a large skillet or cast iron pan, heat up approximately 1 tablespoon of oil, a small amount of butter or lard on the bottom of a pan medium heat. Carefully use a paper towel to make sure oil is spread evenly in pan but is not in excess oil (you are not frying the corn).
  • Once frying pan is heated and ready, cover bottom of skillet with dried corn, making sure not to overlap pieces. Depending on the size of the skillet will depend on how much dried corn you can fit, but my skillet takes 1 1/2 cups.
  • Generously sprinkle with salt.
  • Let dried corn heat till it begins to pop. When I make dried corn in the house, it can pop out of the skillet so I put a clear lid on the top of the corn and remove every 30-45 seconds to stir.
  • Corn should puff up with air and slowly brown. Use a spatula to stir and brown evenly. Corn should not burn or pop into popcorn. If corn begins to burn, remove from heat and then lower heat before adding pan back over flame.
  • The whole process to a medium brown color and an air puff usually takes about 5-7 minutes. Test out a kernel (carefully). Once corn is soft but still crunchy, parched corn is completed.
  • Add additional spices (like more salt or seasonings from the pantry) or sweet brown sugar and stir, remove from heat, and let cool.
  • Store parched corn in a dry cloth bag (for long term storage without moisture) for an easy nutritious snack!

Notes

  • It is only necessary to have oil on the bottom of the pan enough to cover in a thin layer. Any excess oil should be removed. If parched corn is too oily, add to a paper toweled plate to drain excess before storage.
  • If keeping for a long time, store in a cloth bag to avoid moisture and place in a cool dry area. If eating as a snack normally, I store mine in a sealed Tupperware container on the counter and eat over a few weeks with no issues.

Nutrition

Serving: 1 | Calories: 314kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 21mg | Sodium: 338mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 7g

Nutritional Disclaimer: The nutritional data provided here is auto-calculated and intended for your convenience only. As it’s generated via automation, its accuracy may be compromised. For precise nutritional insight, please compute the values utilizing the actual ingredients in your recipe through your chosen nutrition calculator or application.

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5 from 9 votes

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3 Comments

  1. i grew up eating parched corn. this is the first i have seen it on a blog site. obviously i will be spending some more time on your site

    1. Hi Andrea, so glad you came by to check out the parched corn recipe! I am trying to do a lot more old fashioned recipes, glad to hear you remember this from being a kid!

      Trisha

  2. Heather Z says:

    I have been eating this as a child on the farm in Nebraska. Obviously we only got it at the end of the season, when the sweet corn was done and about to be harvested. Now, I bought myself some dried sweet corn online and it comes today and I am totally making this. It is so good and addicting. I never knew it was called parched corn, I just new I loved it. I thought I was the only one who knew what this was, besides my family 🙂 Thank you!!!!

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